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Full text of "Stout Alumnus, Spring 1972"

STOUT STATE UNIVERSITY - MENOMONIE, WISCONSIN 54751 




Page 2 



The Environment 

Students and Faculty at Stout Retain 
an Active Concern for Ecology Through 
Activities in and Outside the Classroom 




by Bill Mikalson 



A Stout student uses laboratory facilities to study an environmental problem. 
Various activities, both in and out of the classroom, are focusing on environmental 
concern at Stout. 



Each day, technology advances 
by leaps and bounds. And each 
day, the ecological imbalance 
grows in direct proportion. Yet, 
concern for the problem appears 
to continue trudging through a 
mire of disbelief and disinterest. 
Such is not the case at Stout 
State University. Here, many 
students and faculty are combin- 
ing their efforts in search of con- 
crete solutions to the ever mount- 
ing number of environment re- 
lated problems. 

Through combined efforts, the 
Stout Environmental Council 
(SEC) transforms the active 
concern of individuals into the 
meaningful action of a group. 
According to Ed Gold, assistant 
professor of chemistry and SEC 
officer, "Council interests range 
from expressing strong opposi- 
tion to the Sanguine Project, 
which threatens the ecology of 
northern Wisconsin by estab- 
lishing a large underground an- 
tenna for the Navy, to the es- 
tablishment of environmental 
courses." 

The environmental crisis is not 
a new problem. Then, why has 
its critical nature just come to 
light ? According to E. M. Lowry, 
professor of biology and SEC of- 
ficer, it hasn't. "People have been 
telling us," he said. "Aldo Leo- 
pold, Paul B. Sears, and William 
Vogt, for example, have been 
forecasting the crisis for years 
in speeches, articles and books. 
It seemed that, not until Rachel 
Carson wrote "Silent Spring," 
did people stop to listen. Two 
years ago people laughed at Sen. 
Gaylord Nelson and his con- 
cern for the environment. Now, 



Page 3 




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George Nelson, associate professor of 
biology, is one of the concerned. 



Nelson, Ralph Nader, Paul Ehr- 
lich and others have become the 
prophets of the crisis." 

The Stout Environmental 
Council was initially conceived 
to conduct educational activities 
related to the environmental 
crisis during Student Week '70, 
a period set aside to pursue in- 
dividual interests ; and on Earth 
Day '70. According to Courtney 
Nystuen, assistant professor of 
industrial graphics, "The goal 
was to sensitize the university 
community to the problems that 
beset our environment and their 
potential solutions. That goal re- 
mains," he continued, "The edu- 
cational effort did not end on 
Apr. 22. A second purpose grew 
out of the pursuit of the educa- 
tional objective: meaningful ac- 
tion — to begin to inventory the 
detrimental effects of Stout's 
total operation on the environ- 
ment and then to take appropri- 
ate remedial action in a rational 
and concerted effort." 

Meaningful action has become 
a key term. Student-faculty pro- 
jects now continue on a year-long 
basis. One group, for example, 
took water samples from the 
Red Cedar River to determine 
the bacterial count, dissolved 
oxygen content, temperature, 
and pH (relative acidity and al- 
kaline). Another project anal- 
yzed the air in Menomonie to de- 
termine the degree of radio-ac- 
tive materials present. Still an- 
other student-faculty team has 
been working to determine the 
major source of phosphate pollu- 
tion in Lake Menomin. 

SEC efforts are continually 
broadening and have now found 
their way into Stout's curricu- 
lum. "Project Approach to Chem- 
istry," taught by Donald F. Clau- 
sen, professor of chemistry, is 
one example. "Here," Gold ex- 
plained, "students learn basic 
chemistry by choosing an area 
that interests them and working 
out related chemistry projects. 
Each semester, students choose 
projects related to air sampling, 
water pollution or other subjects 
lending themselves to research. 
They tackle these projects in a 
practical, intensive and original 
manner." 

A current addition to Stout's 
curriculum is an environmental 
course offered by Donald A. Dick- 
mann, associate professor of 



biology. Student empathy was 
reflected by the fact that the 
course was quickly overfilled. 

Another new course, entitled 
"Environmental Problems : Ur- 
ban De-Development," was held 
during a special two-week session 
at the Christmas break. Team 
taught by Charles Krueger and 
Courtney Nystuen, graphic com- 
munications department, the 
course dealt with energy and 
resource consumption. "The 
amount of resources our nation 
is consuming is not compatible 
with the restricted environment 
available," Krueger warned. 
"Even more critical is the rate of 
resource consumption compared 
to the amount of resources 
available." 

The course was divided into 
three phases : One phase pro- 
vided discussion for students, in- 
structors and outside consul- 
tants ; phase two involved form- 
ulating a problem; and phase 
three centered on a writing team 
working in a specific geographi- 
cal area to solve a previously 
identified problem. 

With the growing student in- 
terest, the SEC hopes that en- 
vironment related courses can be 
extended to other departments. 
"Environmental courses," said 
Gold, "have to combine different 
subjects because environmental 
problems such as pollution and 
population growth involve science 
and human beings. We should 
aim to equip students with the 
knowledge and experience neces- 
sary to deal effectively with en- 
vironmental problems." 

Speaking for the SEC, Gold 
summarized the reasons that the 
environmental crisis has reached 
a crucial stage and can no longer 
be ignored. "The question before 
us now is that of human survival. 
We must begin to see our small 
earth for what it really is — a 
tiny eco-system, with limited 
amounts of air, water and other 
natural resources. 

"Up until now," he continued, 
"mankind has generally ignored 
the mounting evidence that our 
path toward ecological disaster 
is in danger of becoming irrever- 
sible. We need a long term mas- 
sive effort to roll back pollution 
at its roots and to completely re- 
( Continued on Page 10) 

Bill M'kalson is an editorial assistant 
in the Stout Nexvs Bureau, 



Page 4 



President Micheels 



A change in assignment from Chancellor to Dis- 
tinguished Professor for William J. Micheels at Stout 
was approved Feb. 11 by the Board of Regents for 
the new University of Wisconsin System. John C. 
Weaver, system president, recommended the change 
at the request of Micheels for reasons of health. It 
is effective April 1. 

Micheels' title was changed from President to 
Chancellor earlier this year, along with the titles of 
the Presidents at the eight other former Wisconsin 
State Universities. The purpose of the change was 
to provide uniform titles for all university heads 
within the System. The heads of universities in the 
old UW System had been known as Chancellors, 

Micheels, 61, had been recuperating from brain 
surgery which followed a stroke he suffered in Nov- 
ember. He was hospitalized during December, spent 
January at his home and left Feb. 1 to spend a month 
in California convalescing. 

The change in assignment was recommended by 
Vice-Pres. Robert W. Winter, in charge of the former 
State Universities System, who said : 

"Based on the opinion of his physicians, and with 
the relief from administrative pressures as Chancel- 



lor at the University, Dr. Micheels should be able to 
assume a very productive role for the University . . . 
in teaching and other related services." 

The Regents authorized a search and screen 
process to select a new Chancellor for Stout. Dr. 
Ralph Iverson is to continue as Acting Chancellor 
until Micheels' successor is appointed. 

The Board also passed a resolution commending , 
Micheels for his years of service at Stout. The reso- ' 
lution pointed to the growth the University exper- 
ienced under his leadership and how the University's 
nation-wide and world-wide reputation increased. "Be 
it resolved," the resolution read, "that on the occasion . 
of his resignation as Chancellor and appointed as Dis- 
tinguished Professor, the members of the Board com- 
mend him for his contributions to the people of Wis- 
consin and wish him and his devoted wife, Betty, . 
much happiness and good health in the years to 
come." 

A native of Menomonie, Micheels was graduated 
from The Stout Institute and earned Master of Sci- 
ence and Doctor of Philosophy degrees at the Uni- ■ 
versity of Minnesota. 



For Vocational Grads 



The Door's Still Open 



Until a few years ago there 
was only one way a technical 
school student could obtain a 
four year college degree: to en- 
roll in college as a freshman and 
to take four years of work toward 
a Bachelor's degree, the same as 
recent high school graduates. 

Now, however, many technical 
school graduates in Wisconsin 
have the opportunity to apply 
some or all the credit they earn 
toward a college degree at cer- 
tain institutions. The first Wis- 
consin university to use this 
practice was Stout State where, 
since the inception of the pro- 
gram in 1964, more than 580 
technical school students have 
been enrolled. 

According to Richard Lowery, 
assistant director of Admissions, 
Stout now accepts credit from 
16 technical schools in Wiscon- 
sin, all of whom offer two year 
Associate Arts degrees. Credits 
are accepted if they are earned 
as part of the associate degree 
program and if they apply to 



similar subjects offered at the 
University. This means that 
many people with two year tech- 
nical degrees can enter Stout as 
juniors. 

Lowery pointed out that cre- 
dits " transferred from technical 
institutes are given provisional 
approval and are withdrawn if a 
student does not perform satis- 
factory work at the University. 
However, he added that it is rare 
that the University must with- 
draw approval because of poor 
performance by a student. "Most 
of these students would have 
been eligible to enroll in college 
as freshmen," he sard. "This is 
definitely not a lower grade stu- 
dent." Statistics from the last 
seven years show that only five 
percent of the technical school 
students enrolled at Stout are 
dismissed for academic failure. 

Acceptance of technical school 
credits is not an attempt to turn 
technical schools into junior col- 
leges, according to Lowery. 
"Technical schools should not be 



in the business of preparing stu- 
dents for college," he said. "But 
we want to give technical school 
graduates credit for what they 
have done." 

Stout began accepting credit 
from various technical schools 
in Wisconsin after extensive 
studies of these institutions to 
determine if their courses satis- 
fied the requirements of certain 
courses offered at the University. 
Several other state-supported 
universities in Wisconsin now 
have similar policies for credit 
transfer. 

Technical majors attract most 
of these students, with industrial 
technology and industrial educa- 
tion heading the list. Other popu- 
lar programs for technical school 
transfer students are technical 
education, marketing and distri- 
butive education, industrial-voca- 
tional education, business admin- 
istration, hotel and restaurant 
management and home econ- 
omics. 

Transfers from technical 
schools have increased nearly 
every year at Stout, starting 
with nine new enrollees in 1964 
and ranging to 139 new transfer 
students this year. 



Page S 



During Christmas Break: A "Mini™ Session" 



Education facilities, as a 
matter of tradition, lie in 
disuse during various parts 
of the year for vacations, 
holidays and "breaks." In- 
deed, the practice has been 
in effect at every level, pro- 
bably since formal education 
began. But does the tradi- 
tional system of semesters 
and vacation periods best 
serve education today ? 

Officials at Stout believe 
that it may not. To explore 
the possibility of year round 
operation, a "mini-session" 
was conducted over the 
Christmas break at Stout. 
Normally the break has 
been two weeks in length. 
However, under a new cal- 
endar adopted by eight of 
the nine former state uni- 
versities, the first semester 
now ends prior to Christ- 
mas, thus giving students 
a three week break between 
semesters. - . 

The new calendar had 
some obvious advantages : 
Under the old system, stu- 
dents living a great dis- 
tance from Menomonie were 
required to pack off for the 
Christmas holidays, return 
to school for two weeks of 
classes and tests, and then 
leave for home again during 
the semester break. Stu- 
dents living in residence 
halls found this particularly 
difficult. Combining the 
Christmas holiday and sem- 
ester break eased this pro- 
blem. 

At the same time, how- 
ever, it meant that Univer- 
sity facilities would be 
closed for an extensive per- 
iod. Therefore, to give in- 
terested students an oppor- 
tunity to continue their ed- 
ucation during the break, a 
two week "mini-session" 
was offered at Stout, Jan. 
3-13. The session consisted 
of 13 one and two credit 
courses, with a total enroll- 
ment of about 200 students. 

Featured during the per- 
iod were regular courses of- 



fered during the academic 
year, plus courses especial- 
ly designed for the session. 
Offered through the Office 
of Continuing Education at 
Stout, it permitted students 
to spend a concentrated 
period on a single subject. 
Under Board of Eegent 
policy, one credit was 
awarded for each week of 
work. However, students 
could take one two week 
course or two consecutive 
one week courses. The 



courses occupied the same 
status as those offered dur- 
ing the regular year. 

Reaction to the plan was 
highly favorable and a 
similar session is being 
planned for the end of the 
spring semester. 

Wesley Face, vice-presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs, 
sees the session as a step 
toward operating the Uni- 
versity throughout the year 
with courses that range in 
length from one to 52 weeks, 




Mary Etten, a senior from Dorchester, studied, motor mechanics 
during the "mini-session" . 



Page 6 



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Learning Resources 



Facing a changing and expanding technology, 
education — like most of our other social institu- 
tions — is becoming more complex. New and inno- 
vative means of instruction are invading the class- 
room, along with more efficient and effective teach- 
ing methods. 

One of the areas at Stout which services these 
new methods of education is Learning Resources. It 
incorporates traditional library and audio-visual cen- 
ter facilities with new ways of storing and present- 
ing instructional material and information. 

The services it offers range from cataloging and 
storing library materials to providing film and grap- 
hics to aid instruction. It encompasses film, audio 
and television productions for classroom use, main- 
tenance of various equipment and operation of self- 
instruction facilities. The extent of educational ma- 
terials and instructional media used in Learning Re- 
sources leads to a variety of facilities, a few of which 
are pictured here. 



Page 8 





COMMENTS 



By Jack Wile, Executive Secretary 

Planning to attend the American Home Economics 
Association convention in Detroit in June ? A recep- 
tion for Stout alumni attending the convention will 
be held on Tuesday, June 27, from 5 :30 to 7 p.m., at 
one of the convention hotels. (Location will be an- 
nounced in the convention program.) Drop in and say 
"hello" to Jane Rosenthal, Home Economics Dean 
Tony Samenfink, and others from Stout past and 
Stout present. You will also be able to see the new 
Stout Home Economics slide series now in production. 

This year's Homecoming will be held the weekend 
of Oct. 7. We play Stevens Point. The Saturday 
night reunion dinner will honor the classes of 1947, 
1962 and 1967, and alumni will have "beer and sand- 
wiches" together Friday night. There will be plenty 
to do, so save the first weekend in October for 'your 
fall outing and visit back to the campus. You will be 
notified of ticket availability at a later date. 

A total of 1,689 students received degrees from 
Stout in 1971, a one-year record that should stand 
for some time. Because we changed to a new calendar 
that ended the first semester of the 1971-72 school 



year before Christmas, we had four — yes, four — 
commencements in 1971 : 241 graduated in January, 
878 in May, 270 in August, and 300 in December. Each 
new graduate is given a year's free membership in 
the Stout Alumni Association. We hope those who 
have had these free memberships will continue to be 
active, dues-paying members. We need their support 
to continue many alumni services and programs. 

Sten Pierce appreciates the tips you have been 
sending him about prospective football players. Keep 
sending them in! Send tips on prospects for other 
varsity sports to Athletic Director Bill Burns or 
to me. 

Concerning future student population on campus, 
the University of California-Berkeley Research Re- 
porter says that the country continues to move 
toward "increased college access," and characterizes 
the newest college students of the 1970's and 80's as 
"poor students academically and, more often than 
not, poor students financially." When you recom- 
mend Stout to a prospective student, keep in mind 
the fact that the student may need considerable en- 
couragement and assistance from you just to get 
through the process of getting enrolled. If you 
really want to help a young person get into the right 
career ■ — • and we think Stout is a good place to do 
this — • then please recognize the fact that you may 
need to give plenty of "follow-through" ' to be sure 
all opportunities are explored. Write to me, if I can 
help. 

Our library is looking for complete sets of the 
1927-28 and 1932-33 Stoutonias. Our alumni office is 
looking for copies.of the Tower for 1943, 1937, 1919 
and 1918. Contact me, if you have any of the above. 

Each year, one out of every three Stout alumni 
move. When you move, be sure to tell the alumni 
office your new address promptly. 



Campus Notes 

The manager of a large suburban 
Chicago country club has been 
named head of Stout's Hotel and 
Restaurant Management major, 
according to Wesley Face, vice- 
president for Academic Affairs. 
Filling the position is Timothy 
Woods Ross, manager of Glen 
Oak Country Club in Glen Ellyn, 
111. Ross replaces Harry Pur- 
chase who resigned from the 
post last fall to accept a position 
at an eastern college. 

^ H< H* 

Plans to develop special projects 
and activities for senior citizens 
in Dunn County are being formed 
through a joint effort of local 
senior citizens and Stout. The 
plans involve several projects in- 
cluding a proposed center for the 
elderly and the formation of a 
local chapter of the American 
Association of Retired People. 



The fall issue of the "Journal of 
Industrial Teacher Education" 
is dedicated to John A. Jarvis, 
professor of mathematics at 
Stout. The Journal is the leading 
publication in the field of indus- 
trial teacher education and is 
published by the National Asso- 
ciation of Industrial and Tech- 
nical Teacher Educators. 

H< * * 

The first person to receive a de- 
gree in Child Development and 
Family Life at Stout was among 
the graduates at winter com- 
mencement ceremonies, Dec. 23. 
Receiving the degree was Teri 
Cameron, a native of Ironwood, 
Mich. Approved early last year, 
the major prepares students to 
work in child and family service 
agencies such as foster care 
centers, social welfare agencies 
and orphanages. 

^ # ^ 

Calling the expansion of presi- 
dential power the most serious 



and dangerous issue facing the 
American public today, former 
Sen. Wayne Morse said we are 
reaching a point where the 
President can usurp power and 
the public merely takes it. Morse 
spoke at Stout Dec. 13 as part of 
the speakers forum series. He 
laid heavy criticism on President 
Nixon's domestic and foreign 
policy, charging the President 
with going beyond his constitu- 
tional power in continuing the 
Vietnam War. 

Children and adolescents who are 
having trouble adjusting to 
school can receive help at a new 
psychology and diagnostic center 
which is now open at Stout. The 
center, which will primarily 
serve residents of Dunn and five 
neighboring counties, is being 
operated by the School of Educa- 
tion at Stout in conjunction with 
school psychology, and counsel- 
ing and guidance majors. 



Page 9 



Class Notes 



'13 

Enjoying' retirement and a new 
home is OTTO BRUNKOW, who re- 
sides with his wife, Genieve, at 819 
Holiday Dr., Sandwich, 111. 

'19 

ELSIE LAMPE GREEN, 80, and 
her husband, Eric, 79, 1106 3rd St., 
Brookings, S. D., recently celebrated 
their 40th wedding anniversary. 

'37 

MARION MILLER FLETCHER, 

former home economics teacher, now 
works with the mentally retarded and 
geriatric patients at Friendly Village 
Nursing Home in Rhinelander, since 
the death of her husband. She resides 
on Lake George. 

'50 

The Marinette Board of Education 
has named LLOYD HARMON local 
vocational education coordinator. He 
has been associated with the school 
since 1946. 

'51 

JOHN POELLINGER, La Crescent, 
Minn., has been named president of 
the Greater La Crosse Chamber of 
Commerce. He operates Poellinger 
Inc., a lathing and plastering firm in 
La Crosse. 

JOHN WOOLLEY (MS 59), an avid 
Green Bay Packer fan, is the new 
world champion liar. The annual 
award was given by the Burlington 
Liars' Club for Woolley's winning 
prevarication. "I remember," Woolley 
said, "when the Packer return special- 
ist ran back punts so fast he often 
drew roughing the kicker penalties on 
his punt returns." 

'57 

BASIL HOLDER, Black River Falls, 
was among 10 selected insurance re- 
presentatives taking part in courses 
pertaining to financial planning at the 
home office of National Life Insurance 
Co. of Montpelier, Vt. Holder has been 
in life insurance since 1965. 

RICHARD ROBERTS (MS 62), 
Madison, assumed duties Dec. 1 as 
field administrator for Vocational, 
Technical and Adult Education Dis- 
trict 15. He had been associated with 
the Wisconsin Department of Public 
Instruction. 

'58 

Wife of a Lutheran missionary, 
mother and teacher all describe JOAN 
WONOSKI REIMER. The Reimer 
family have been living in Seoul, 
South Korea, for the past 10 years. 
She is a food supervisor at the Seoul 
foreign school where she also teaches. 

'59 

RONALD T. WRIGHT has been 
promoted from assistant professor to 
associate professor of industrial edu- 
cation and technology at Ball State 
University, Muncie, Ind. He has been 
at Ball State since 1966. 



'61 

A Menomonie veteran educator, ED 
PHELAN, was presented the "Citizen 
of the Year" award at the recent an- 
nual meeting of the Greater Menomo- 
nie Area Chamber of Commerce, Cur- 
rently principal of Menomonie Junior 
High, he has devoted 42 years to the 
teaching profession and is a talented 
after-dinner speaker and master of 
ceremonies. 

'64 

U. S. Air Force Capt. GENE A. 
SMIT of Fond du Lac, has received 
two awards of the Distinguished Fly- 
ing Cross for aerial achievement in 
Southeast Asia. He was presented 
the medal at Charleston AFB, S. C, 
where he now serves with a unit of 
the Military Airlift Command. 

'66 

MARGARET WARD, Whitewater, 
has joined the staff of the Southern 
Furniture Manufacturers Association 
as a home economist. She is a former 
high school home economics instructor. 

MICHAEL H. SCHIPPER, Milwau- 
kee, was graduated from the UW - 
Milwaukee with a Bachelor's degree 
in architecture and is now attending 
graduate school there. 

'67 

A new face at Ripon High School 
this school term is JEANNE BON- 
NEFOI (MS 71), who teaches home 
economics. 



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'68 

WAYNE PETERSON is hill man- 
ager at the New Port Mountain ski 
operation at Salmo. He has been on 
the ski school staff for five years. 

Capt. CARL H, RIIS received the 
Air Force Distinguished Flying Cross 
for aerial skill in Southeast Asia as a 
C-130 pilot. He is stationed in North 
Carolina. 

'70 

TIMOTHY LEMKE is now a metals 
instructor in the Bruce school system. 
He had been employed as a machinist 
for the University of Minnesota Phy- 
sics Research Department. 

Airman First Class ANTHONY W. 
RUSSO, Springfield, 111., received a 
certificate naming him Far East Com- 
munications Region Airman of the 
Quarter at Fuclra Air Station, Japan. 
He is a communication specialist 
there. 

'71 

Among the six new dietetic interns 
who are enrolled at Perth Amboy Gen- 
eral Hosp., Perth Amboy, N. J., is 
CATHERINE HIEMENZ of Wauwa- 
tosa. This is a nine-month post-grad- 
uate program preparing the interns to 
be registered dietitians. 

JUDY WESTFALL ROMMEL is the 
new extension home economist for 
Buffalo County. 

RICK NO WAK, Merrill, is teaching 
industrial arts at the Westfield High 
School. 



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Recipients of Distinguished Alumni Awards chat with Wesley 
Face, vice-president for Academic Affairs, during winter com- 
mencement exercises at Stotit. Pictured here are Harvard C. 
Smith (BS 25, MS 48), Kenosha; and Alma G. Rausch (88), Mil- 
waukee. Miss Rausch has devoted more than 83 years to her 
career as a home economist, planning and operating major cafe- 
terias throughout the country. Smith devoted many years of 
public service to schools in the Kenosha area before retiring. 



Page 10 



JEAN ANDERSON, New Auburn, 
who received her Bachelor's degree 
in home economics education, has re- 
turned to Stout to obtain a Bachelor's 
in dietetics and a Master's in foods 
and nutrition. 

WANDA HUISMAN, Newark, 111., 
is in Vietnam working as a recreation 
aid with the Bed Cross staff. 

A new art instructor at Franklin 
Middle School, Franklin, is CHARLES 
JANSKY of Manitowoc. 

CHARLES KRUPA, Neenah, is 
teaching industrial arts at La Farge 
School. He also took over the duties 
of basketball coach. 

Airman JAMES W. BEHRLE, St. 
Charles, 111., has completed his basic 
training at Lackland AFB, Tex. He 
is now assigned to Keesler AFB, Miss., 
for training in communications-elec- 
tronics systems. 

LORNA M. HANSON, Route 1, 
Baldwin, a dietetics major, is interning 
at St. Mary's Hosp., Rochester, Minn. 

On display in the new American 
Home Economics Building in Wash- 
ington, D.C., are two wall hangings 
woven by ELLEN LOTZ, while a 
student at Stout. She is now teaching 
at West De Pere High School. 

Back home in Sudan working as as- 
sistant management specialist with 
the Sudan Governmnet is ZACHARIA 
D. MANGORDIT. His address is P.O. 
Box 2308, Khartoum, Sudan. 



Little Devils 



Deathi 



'12 

ELSA GROLL HEISEL, Sept. 27, 
in Covington, Ky. 

'23 

PALMER 0. JOHNSON, 68, 7015 
Franklin Ave., Middleton, Jan. 4, 1972, 
at St. Mary's Hosp., Madison, after a 
brief illness. Survived by his wife, 
Lois; a daughter and a son. 

'29 

IRMGARD A. SCHWARTZ DERI- 
VAN, 62, Nov. 20, at Fox Lake. 

'32 

ALBERT O. ANDERSON, 2425 
90th St., Sturtevant, Nov. 12. Sur- 
vived by his wife, Frances. 

'34 

ARTHUR G. SCHEFTNER, 60, 
Dec. 22, of a massive stroke while 
teaching in Mequon. He had taught 
for 37 years in the Milwaukee school 
system. Survived by his wife, Flor- 
ence; a son and a daughter. 

MARIE KOHL FLINT, 59, 919 
Ninth St., Menomonie, Jan. 27, 1972, at 
University Hospital in Mpls. She 
taught school for two years prior to 
her marriage in 1938. Survived by 
her husband, Joseph; two sons and a 
daughter. 

'43 

BETH CHRISTENSON GORR, 49, 
Dec. 7, of leukemia in Wausau. Sur- 
vived by her husband, Harold. 



'61 

An adopted daughter, Sarah Jo, 
Sept. 29, by PAUL C. (MS 63) and 
JO-ANN HEINZ JENSEN, 1854 Deck- 
ner Ave., Green Bay. He is a metals 
shop instructor at Edison Junior High 
School. 

'62 

A son, John, Feb. 1971, to CARL 
and ADELE PETERSON HELMLE, 

3240 Nobb Hill Dr., Racine. He is a 
media specialist in the Racine Unified 
School District No. 1. 

'63 

A son, Peter, Sept. 28, to Mr. and 
Mrs, WAYNE B. CLARK, 3628 S. 
89th St., Milwaukee. He is employed 
by the Allis-Chalmers Corp., power 
transformer div., as manager of em- 
ployee relations. 

A daughter, Kathryn Ann, to Mr. 
and Mrs. ROGER SCHAEFER, 415 
20th Ave. W., Menomonie. He is as- 
sociate professor of industrial teacher 
education at Stout. 

'64 

A daughter, Susanne Beth, Sept. 22, 
to David and PATRICIA KURITZ 
PAINTER, 2580 Boyle Ave., Granite 
City, 111. . S^he teaches family living 
at Venice Lincoln Technical Center. 

A daughter, Noel Collette, Oct, 22, 
to HAVEN J. (MS 65) and BONNIE 
JENNINGS WILLIAMS (BS 65), 3202 
Thunderbird Lane, Wausau. He is a 
vocational graphics instructor at North 
Central Technical Institute. She is ex- 
tension home economist for Marathon 
County. 

'65 

A son, Bradley Jay, Oct. 29, to 
JACK (MS 66) and MARSHA DEM- 
SKE KLEIN (BS 66), 3101 Polzer Dr., 
Wausau. He is an electronics instruc- 
tor at North Central Technical In- 
stitute. 

'66 

A daughter, Tracey Lynn, Aug. 15, 
to Mr. and Mrs, DENNIS LEONARD, 
2906 Madonna Dr., Wausau. He teach- 
es industrial arts at Wausau East 
High School. 



'67 

A daughter, Ann Renee, Nov. 15, 
to Mr. and Mrs. JOHN T. HAMMER, 
710 Messer St., Rhinelander. He is 
an instructor at the Rhinelander High 
School. 

A son, Jeffrey, Aug. 12, to TED 
(MS 69) and JULIE VOSS SEHMER, 
119 La Crosse St., Beaver Dam. He 
is a graphic arts instructor at Beaver 
Dam Senior High School. 

A daughter, Sept. 14, to Mr, and 
Mrs. DAVID W. PIECHOWSKI, 172 
S. 84th St., Milwaukee. He is em- 
ployed by Allis-Chalmers as a com- 
puter analyst. 

'68 

A son, Eric Richard, July 23, to 
Peter A. and DIANNE NEY TOT- 
TEN, 92 Optical St., Geneva, N. Y. 

A son, Brian Scott, Nov. 18, to KEN 
and SANDIE AXELSEN, Rockford, 
111. 

A son, Jeffrey Scott, Dec. 19, to 
Ron and CHERYL KRAGH SLAG- 
TER, 1907 Carlisle Ave., Racine. 

'70 

A daughter, Whitney Brooke, Aug. 
26, to JOHN and CINDY VANCE 
CLAVIN, 3010 Harvey St., Madison. 



Ecology 



(Continued from Page 3) 

organize our national priorities. 
We must learn to live in harmony 
with nature and we must stop 
fouling the air we breathe and 
the water we drink. Nobody has 
a right to poison the environ- 
ment in which we all live. 

"There are four major inter- 
connected threats to mankind," 
he explained, "wars of mass des- 
truction, pollution, overpopula- 
tion and the depletion of our na- 
tural resources. It is essential 
that we tackle all of these prob- 
lem areas if we expect our grand- 
children to inherit a liveable 
world. The environmental crisis 
is a challenge, but it is also an op- 
portunity to save ourselves by 
saving the only world we have." 



THE STOUT ALUMNUS 

The Stout Alumnus is the official publication of the Alumni Association of Stout State 
University, Menomonie, Wis., It is published quarterly and entered at the post office at 
Menomonie, Wis., as third class matter. 

Richard Seitz President 

Otto Baker '. Vice-Pres. 

Donna Albrecht Sec.-Treas. 

Jack Wile Executive Sec. 

John K. Enger Editor 

Judy Olson Ass't. to the Editor 

John Williams Photos 



Page 11 



Marriages 



'62 

Bonita Wolcott Cherney to RON- 
ALD CHARLES MILLER (MS 68), 
Sept. 25, in Marshfield. 

'63 

Karen Gullicksrud to STEVEN 
HANSON, Aug. 28, in Strum. 

'66 

JUDITH WEISS to Allon Peterson, 
July 24. 

'67 

Jeanne Marie Lepp to VICTOR 
JOSEPH ZINDA, Aug. 14, in Green 
Bay. 

Janie Hoerth to RICHARD DAW- 
SON (MS 69), Aug. 14, in Kloten. 

'68 

SHEILA D. ROECKER to EUGENE 
A. STEMANN, Aug. 7, at Eagleton. 

JEANNE ELAINE BAUER to 
Daniel John Hamilton, Dec. 18, in 
Fond du Lac. 

KATHLEEN FALLON (MS 69) to 
Timothy W. Fuller, Dec. 18, in Osh- 
kosh. 

'69 

DOROTHY ANN OPPERMAN to 
Paul Martin Andersen, Sept. in Shaw- 
ano. 

'70 

NANCY J. DAUCK to DARYL J. 
ERTL (BS 71), July 31, in Middleton. 

LESLIE K. LUNDAHL to Michael 
Anderson, July 2. 

MARY LOU VAN DE WALLE to 
ROBERT A. JONES (BS 71), July 17, 
in De Pere. 

Marcia Mary Last to GREGORY 
CHARLES RYAN, Aug. 7, in White- 
law. 

NANCY LEE BOLAND to DON- 



ALD LEE BERNSTEIN, Aug. 14, in 

PHYLLIS M. ATHMAN to RO- 
BERT L. DENNEE, Aug. 21, in St. 
Cloud, Minn. 

GLORIA J. REHN to Dale C. Heil- 
man, Aug. 14, in Morgan. 

KAY ANNE SONNTAG to Paul 
Charles Wilson, Sept. 25, in Two 
Rivers. 

JEANINE DILL to Charles W. 
Koch, Sept. 11, in Racine. 

KAREN KAY PETERSON to RO- 
BERT ZWISSLER, Sept. 4, in Marsh- 
field. 

Aline Holman to MICHAEL RUTA, 
Sept. 11, in Chippewa Falls. 

LOIS JEAN LANGE to Jon Florian 
Stiehr, Sept. 5, in Fond du Lac. 

Pamela Marie Malnowski to ROGER 
JOHN ZELL, Nov. 20, in Escanoba, 
Mich. 

JUDITH ANN FREMSTAD to Eu- 
gene Gerard Guse, Sept. 25, at Plea- 
santville. 

Patricia Wagner to DARRYL D. 
HAFFNER, June 26, in Milwaukee. 

JULIE ANN GROSS (MS 71) to 
STEVEN R. WILSON, Nov. 13, in 
Sheboygan Falls. 

Sally Soderberg to RICHARD 
NORTHROP, Oct. 16, in Menomonie. 

CYNTHIA ANN STANELLE to 
Richard Tienor, Oct. 9, in Forest Junc- 
tion. 

BARBARA ANN BASTA to Billy 
G. Smith, Oct. 23, in Wausau. 

'71 

- MARLENE RAPOVICH to Lt. J. G. 
John R. Purkat, Oct. 2, in Hibbing, 
Minn. 

KATHRYN L. WOOD to KENNETH 
J. ZIEBELL (BS 70), June 19, in 
Evansville. 

YVETTE MARIE ENGLEBRET- 
SON to Jesse Francis Zvolena, June 
19, at Loyal. 

Brenda Lou Breyer to CURTIS 
EARL GINNOW, June 12, in Dale. 

BARBARA ANN BURZYNSKI to 
Randal John Ahlers, June, in Gilman. 



MARY LOU LIEGEL to HAROLD 
LEE FULLER, June 19, in Logan- 
ville. 

LYNDALL ELIZABETH JONES to 
DAVID PHILIP PERSZYK, June, in 
Milwaukee. 

ANNA MAE KOCH to William P. 
Crownhart, June 26. in Watertown. 

DEANNA JOY MILLER to Kenneth 
Lee Applehans, June 19, in Barron. 

JANE M. WELLS to THOMAS 
MICHAEL REBNE (BS 70), June 19, 
in Monroe. 

SHARON SUE PFEIFER to DENIS 
MELVIN UTECHT, June, in Fond du 
Lac. 

LA DONNA RAE NASS to Larry 
Hazen, Nov. 13, in Coleman. 

PEGGY LYNN WERY to Richard 
Warner Kookogey, Nov. 24, in Green 
Bay. 

Carol Jeanne Epping to MARK R. 
HUCKSTORF, Sept. 25, in Burlington; 

LOLETA DODGE to LEO UDEE, 
Dec. 18, in Janesville. 

CAROL ANN LARSEN to Garry D. 
Winchell, Aug. 7, in Luck. 

ROBERTA E. MAKI to MICHAEL 
0. ZIEBELL, July 17, in Aurora. 

MARY LOUISE GONWA to DAVID 
R. COPPINS, July 17, in Dacada. 

Mary Sue Seiler to WILLIAM 
CARL FOTH, Aug. 6, in Green Bay. 

BARBARA JEAN STEGER to Stev- 
en Fromader, July 24, in Darlington. 

JANE ELLEN BOHMAN to John C. 
Wagner, Aug. 21, in Stratford. 

JANE BRECKER to Gerald Even- 
stad, Aug. 19, in Darlington. 

REGINA MARIE URBAN to Rich- 
ard Kenneth Batchelor, Sept., in Mil- 
waukee. 

LYNN MARIE BENDER to RICH- 
ARD G. HEIL, Aug. 7, in Mosinee. 

KAREN ANN GERLOFF to STEV- 
EN DALE SPILDE, Sept., in Milwau- 
kee. 

PATRICIA REHBERG to JAMES 
RIEDERER, Sept. 4, at Franksville. 

BARB MICHALOWSKI to WAYNE 
FISH, July 31. 

CATHE EWANIC to TIM FUCHS, 
Aug. 8, in Chicago. 



L. 



This year's regular summer 
session will run from June 19 — 
Aug. 11. There will be a two- 
week pre-session from June 5 — 
June 16. If you are interested 
in the regular or pre-session or 
both, please complete and return 
this form and a Summer Session 
Bulletin will be mailed to you. 
The Bulletin contains informa- 
tion on housing, course offerings 
and fees. 

Several special offerings dur- 
ing the summer session, but for 
less than eight weeks duration, 
are available in graphic arts, 
early childhood education, school 
food service and a workshop for 
homemaking teachers. A Euro- 
pean study tour in fashion and 
fabrics will be conducted by the 
Stout staff. 



Summer Session '72 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



CITY STATE 



ZIP 



Please mail this form to Summer Session Director, Stout State 
University, Menomonie, Wisconsin 54751. 



Page 12 



Sports 



Seeking his third straight 
Wisconsin State University. Con- 
ference wrestling title this year 
is Dale Evans, a 134 pound junior 
from Windsor, Wis. 

In contrast to his aggressive- 
ness on the mat, Dale is describ- 
ed by Coach Sten Pierce as a 
"humble, mild-mannered, soft- 
spoken, shy and bashful appear- 
ing person who is very coachable 
and involves himself mentally 
and physically the year round. 
This is the key to his success." 

"He is the first wrestler that 
I have coached that doesn't be- 
come stymied with whatever he 
faces with an opponent." Pierce 
added, "He always has a move 
that will counter or neutralize an 
opponent's move. He never pan- 
ics — a cool competitor under 
all circumstances." 

"Dale was not a blue chip 
wrestler in high school," said 
Pierce. "He is a late comer and 
those are the best. His exper- 
ience is vast." 

Coach Pierce compares Evans 
to another Stout great, John 
Peterson (71), who also did little 
in high school but went on to win 
three conference championships 
as a Blue Devil in the 167 pound 
class. Peterson placed fifth in 
the Nationals and wrestled with 
the U.S. team in the World 
Wrestling Tournament in Sophia, 
Bulgaria, in the 185 class. 

Evans, who is very active in 
amateur free - style wrestling 
along with Peterson, will try out 
for the U.S. Olympic team. 

In a 16 team meet at St. Cloud, 







Dale Evans 

Evans pinned three of four op- 
ponents, the final man in 54 se- 
conds for first place. During the 
meet, he. had no match points 
scored against him. 

At the Northern Iowa Open 
Tournament at Cedar Falls, Dale- 
out of 45 wrestlers in his class- 
met his brother Steve, a fresh- 
man at the University of Wis- 
consin - Madison, for the first- 
place match. They decided they 
would not wrestle each other and 
met on the mat only to shake 
hands and walk off with the first 
and second place metals. 

Evans, who has compiled a 
143-33-1 record since his fresh- 
man year in high school, prefers 
wrestling to the many other 
sports he competed in because 
of the definite one-to-one situa- 
tion. 

"It's like boxing," said Evans, 
"man against man with no third 




*» ^*»n' 



« v*> 




John Peterson 

factor. As far as strategy is con- 
cerned, it's all action-reaction. 
You attack all opponents the 
same, but they all will react dif- 
ferently. I'm 5-7, but in my class 
I've faced guys 5-4 and 6-0; and 
you have to keep going at him 
until he questions your move. 
That's when you know you have 
him." 

Peterson has been making 
headlines since his graduation 
from Stout. Recently, he was 
selected to an American team to 
wrestle a group of touring Rus- 
sian Olympic stars at Kent, Ohio. 

Wrestling at about 190 pounds, 
Peterson has been participating 
in major meets around the coun- 
try. He intends to try out for 
the U.S. Olympic team and is ex- 
pected to make a strong bid. He 
was a three-time WSU Confer- 
ence champion while at Stout. 



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Menomonie, Wisconsin / 54751 



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